Feminism: #HereWeAre

In honor of Women’s History Month and in light of the ongoing needs to continue talking about equality, #HereWeAre seeks to highlight the power of talking about feminism: what it means for us individually, what it means for us collectively, and why it’s one of the most powerful and life-changing parties around.This is a prime time to talk about our feminism, why we still need feminism, and to honor feminists of all shapes, sizes, colors, abilities, genders, sexualities, and more. Feminism is a party for all of us. Let’s celebrate.

The #HereWeAre hashtag honors the new book Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World, an anthology of art, essays, comics, and more from 44 voices on the topic of feminism.

Source: Thunderclap: Feminism: #Here We Are
Author: Kelly Jensen, editor of Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World & blogger at Stacked Books

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I need feminism because…

  • Women’s health concerns are more likely to be dismissed by doctors: How Doctors Take Women’s Pain Less Seriously (Oct 2015); Shame, Dismissal, Agony: Women With Endometriosis Speak Out (Mar 2017); Why are women with brain tumours being dismissed as attention-seekers? (Jan 2016).
  • My value as a wife should not be judged by how well I “keep house.” Like, I can’t remember the last time I found the oomph to clean without imminent guests (and for close family or friends, please don’t expect me to tidy very much). If I do find some oomph, I spend it on exciting things like cooking supper, taking a shower, leaving the house… not cleaning the fucking house.
  • Cussing doesn’t make me less of a woman, damnit.
  • My husband’s active participation in parenting and housekeeping should not seem rare when my mom friends and I talk about “division of labor” in our marriages.

I practice feminism when…

  • Listening to women experiencing intersectional oppression and boosting their voices.
  • Advocating for bodily autonomy, especially for women; advocating for myself and my own body.
  • Showing my son that STEM is for everyone.
  • Allowing my son to experience and express his emotions.
  • Encouraging my son to engage in imaginative play of all kinds, including “domestic arts.”
  • Teaching my son gender is not binary; letting him tell me how his stuffed animal friends identify and which pronouns they prefer.
Ripley & Jones

Ripley (xenomorph slayer) and Jones (brave cat). Source: comingsoon.net

My feminist role models are…

  • Courtney Summers, who writes stories of young women grappling with the challenges of being female in circumstances all-too-relatable. (Yes, even the one with zombies has relatable struggle!)
  • Ellen Ripley (Alien franchise); if you have to ask why, like, DO YOU EVEN POWER LOADER FIGHT XENOMORPHS, BRO?
  • Emma Watson, Global Goodwill Ambassador of UN Women; see HeForShe for more info on the gender equality campaign.
  • Kaywinnet Lee “Kaylee” Frye (Firefly franchise), sex-positive mechanic who enjoys food, dresses however she wants, and defends what she loves.
  • Kelly Jensen, for her everyday feminism, for the anthology, for events like today’s, and of course for all the bookish commentary/content/etc.
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